Freedom to Read and Banned Books


Freedom to Read Week

Sponsored by The Book and Periodical Council

Freedom to read can never be taken for granted. Even in Canada, a free country by world standards, books and magazines are banned at the border. Schools and libraries are regularly asked to remove books and magazines from their shelves. Free expression on the Internet is under attack. Few of these stories make headlines, but they affect the right of Canadians to decide for themselves what they choose to read.

During Freedom to Read Week 2012 we were fortunate to have PJ Carefoote (Librarian at the U of T Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, and former ESA Staff Member) in to workshop some of our students.  At that time he left us with a summary of the “highlights” of Literary Censorship through the ages.

Freedom to Read Week is celebrated the last week of February.

 

Banned Books Week
Sponsored by the American Library Association

Banned Books Week (BBW) is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read and the importance of the First Amendment.  Held during the last week of September, Banned Books Week highlights the benefits of free and open access to information while drawing attention to the harms of censorship by spotlighting actual or attempted bannings of books across the United States.

Intellectual freedom—the freedom to access information and express ideas, even if the information and ideas might be considered unorthodox or unpopular—provides the foundation for Banned Books Week.  BBW stresses the importance of ensuring the availability of unorthodox or unpopular viewpoints for all who wish to read and access them.

The books featured during Banned Books Week have been targets of attempted bannings.  Fortunately, while some books were banned or restricted, in a majority of cases the books were not banned, all thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, booksellers, and members of the community to retain the books in the library collections.  Imagine how many more books might be challenged—and possibly banned or restricted—if librarians, teachers, and booksellers across the country did not use Banned Books Week each year to teach the importance of our First Amendment rights and the power of literature, and to draw attention to the danger that exists when restraints are imposed on the availability of information in a free society.

Banned Books Week is typically celebrated the first week of October.

 

 

Please feel free to use the reply form below to advise regarding any other resources you think should be added to this list.  Please also advise if any of the links breakdown (as is frequently the case with the internet!)

 

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